the patina of age




Patina (/?pæt?n?/ or /p??ti?n?/) is a thin layer that variously forms on the surface of stone; on copper, bronze and similar metals (tarnish produced by oxidation or other chemical processes);[1] on wooden furniture (sheen produced by age, wear, and polishing); or any such acquired change of a surface through age and exposure. Patinas can provide a protective covering to materials that would otherwise be damaged by corrosion or weathering. They may also be aesthetically appealing.

Last month I collected an old metal box from my Dad. It’s not any old metal box though, it’s a box that my late Grandfather carried during the First World War – I think it was originally an ammunition box and has been kept in the family and is over 100 years old. Amongst other markings the box is stenciled with my Grandfathers name on it.

After all this time it remains in the family and now been put to a new use as a box that holds various ‘craft’ materials for my two grandchildren – I think there is something neat about this staying in the family and the great great grandchildren of my granddad making use of this family ‘heirloom’.